1836 OREGON 1st/1st Astoria by Washington Irving INDIANS Fur Trade Gold MAP

IRVING, Washington

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Washington Irving’s book “Astoria” is an 1836 history of John Jacob Astor’s expedition to Oregon. In 1810, Astor and his company set off to establish trapping and fur trading in the American northwest. The company only lasted for 3 years, but in that time, Astor and the rest of the Pacific Fur Company were able to provide Irving with sufficient information for him to write his famous book.

 

Astoria” covers every aspect of the Astor expedition from dangerous encounters, Missouri river navigation, grizzly bear and buffalo hunts, gold mining, and Native American Indian visitors (i.e. Sioux, Crow, Arickara, etc.)! In fact, Field states that this book is “crowded with incidents of Indian subtlety or ferocity” This book has long been considered one of the foundational works in understanding the American West.

 

Note the numerous bibliographers that mention this work:

 

Wheat states this work is,

“an important milestone in western mapping.”

 

Per Howes,

“Classic account of the first American attempt at settlement of the Pacific Coast”

 

From Larned,

“a book indispensable to the student of the early History of Oregon.”

$1,500.00

In stock

Free shipping wordwide!


Satisfaction Guaranteed

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1836 OREGON 1st/1st Astoria by Washington Irving INDIANS Fur Trade Gold MAP

 

Washington Irving’s book “Astoria” is an 1836 history of John Jacob Astor’s expedition to Oregon. In 1810, Astor and his company set off to establish trapping and fur trading in the American northwest. The company only lasted for 3 years, but in that time, Astor and the rest of the Pacific Fur Company were able to provide Irving with sufficient information for him to write his famous book.

 

Astoria” covers every aspect of the Astor expedition from dangerous encounters, Missouri river navigation, grizzly bear and buffalo hunts, gold mining, and Native American Indian visitors (i.e. Sioux, Crow, Arickara, etc.)! In fact, Field states that this book is “crowded with incidents of Indian subtlety or ferocity” This book has long been considered one of the foundational works in understanding the American West.

 

Note the numerous bibliographers that mention this work:

 

Wheat states this work is,

“an important milestone in western mapping.”

 

Per Howes,

“Classic account of the first American attempt at settlement of the Pacific Coast”

 

From Larned,

“a book indispensable to the student of the early History of Oregon.”

 

Item number: #14947

Price: $1500

 

IRVING, Washington

 

Astoria : or Anecdotes of an enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains

 

Philadelphia : Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1836. First edition, first state.

 

Details:

  • Collation: Complete with all pages; 2 volumes
    • Vol 1: xii, 285, [3]
      • Includes large folding map
    • Vol 2: 279p
  • References: Graff 2158; Hill 872; Howes I 81; Wheat 419; Field 760; Sabin 53129; Wagner-Camp 61.1; BAL 10148; Larned 2051
  • First state points:
    • “Henry W. Rees, Stereotyper” on verso of title-page
    • without signature “1*” on page 5
    • no footnote on p.259, vol 2
  • Language: English
  • Provenance: Handwritten and Stamp; Caleb B. Smith-Smith was appointed by President Zachary Taylor to serve as a member of the board of commissioners to adjust claims against Mexico from 1849 to 1851. He resumed private practice in Cincinnati, Ohio, from 1851 to 1859. He was a member of the Peace Convention of 1861 held in Washington, D.C., in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending American Civil War. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to serve as the 6th United States Secretary of the Interior from March 5, 1861, to January 1, 1863. However, Smith had little interest in the job and, with declining health, delegated most of his responsibilities to Assistant Secretary of the Interior John Palmer Usher. When Lincoln showed the draft of the Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet, the conservative Smith considered resignation upon its public announcement, but accepted the decision in the end. Smith was nominated by President Abraham Lincoln on December 16, 1862, to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Indiana vacated by Judge Elisha Mills Huntington. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 22, 1862, and received his commission the same day. His service terminated on January 7, 1864, due to his death in Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana.
  • Binding: Hardcover; tight and secure
    • Cloth
  • Size: ~9in X 6in (22.5cm x 15cm)
  • Rare and desirable

 

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14947

 

Categories

Americana, American History

Voyages & Exploration & Maps

Authors

IRVING, Washington

Printing Date

19th Century

Language

English

Binding

Hardcover

Book Condition

Excellent

Collation

Complete