1739 EARLY America Jamaica Slavery Maps George Whitefield INDIANS Great Awakening

URBAN, Sylvanus [Edward Cave]

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The Gentleman’s Magazine was an English periodical which first appeared in 1731. It was published without interrupt for nearly 200 years and was the first of its kind to use the term ‘magazine’. It was published by Edward Cave, pseud. Sylvanus Urban.

 

From 1738 to 1746, Edward Cave published in occasional issues of The Gentleman’s Magazine semi-fictionalized accounts of contemporary debates in the two Houses of Parliament under the title of “Debates in the Senate of Lilliput. The names of the speakers in the debates, other individuals mentioned, politicians and monarchs present and past, and most other countries and cities of Europe (“Degulia”) and America (“Columbia”) were thinly disguised under a variety of Swiftian pseudonyms. This was because they were using the characters and culture from Jonathan Swift’s book, “Gulliver’s Travels”. The disguised names, and the pretense that the accounts were really translations of speeches by Lilliputian politicians, were a reaction to an Act of Parliament forbidding the publication of accounts of its debates. Cave employed several notable writers on this series: William Guthrie (June 1738 – November 1740), Samuel Johnson (November 1740 – February 1743), and John Hawkesworth (February 1743 – December 1746).

 

This volume from the 1739 edition includes a variety of important and interesting contents including:

  • Parliamentary Debate
  • Petitions to the Bill of Rights
  • Notes on negroes in Jamaica
  • Stories of Native American Indians
  • Accounts of George Whitefield and discourse concerning his theological disagreements with his peers John and Charles Wesley that lead to their division.
    • Whitefield accepted the Church of England’s doctrine of predestination and disagreed with the Wesley brothers’ Arminian views on the doctrine of the atonement. As a result, Whitefield did what his friends hoped he would not do—hand over the entire ministry to John Wesley. Whitefield formed and was the president of the first Methodist conference, but he soon relinquished the position to concentrate on evangelical work.
  • Notes on Russia and Crimea

$499.00

In stock

Free shipping wordwide!


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1739 EARLY America Jamaica Slavery Maps George Whitefield INDIANS Great Awakening

 

The Gentleman’s Magazine was an English periodical which first appeared in 1731. It was published without interrupt for nearly 200 years and was the first of its kind to use the term ‘magazine’. It was published by Edward Cave, pseud. Sylvanus Urban.

 

From 1738 to 1746, Edward Cave published in occasional issues of The Gentleman’s Magazine semi-fictionalized accounts of contemporary debates in the two Houses of Parliament under the title of “Debates in the Senate of Lilliput. The names of the speakers in the debates, other individuals mentioned, politicians and monarchs present and past, and most other countries and cities of Europe (“Degulia”) and America (“Columbia”) were thinly disguised under a variety of Swiftian pseudonyms. This was because they were using the characters and culture from Jonathan Swift’s book, “Gulliver’s Travels”. The disguised names, and the pretense that the accounts were really translations of speeches by Lilliputian politicians, were a reaction to an Act of Parliament forbidding the publication of accounts of its debates. Cave employed several notable writers on this series: William Guthrie (June 1738 – November 1740), Samuel Johnson (November 1740 – February 1743), and John Hawkesworth (February 1743 – December 1746).

 

This volume from the 1739 edition includes a variety of important and interesting contents including:

  • Parliamentary Debate
  • Petitions to the Bill of Rights
  • Notes on negroes in Jamaica
  • Stories of Native American Indians
  • Accounts of George Whitefield and discourse concerning his theological disagreements with his peers John and Charles Wesley that lead to their division.
    • Whitefield accepted the Church of England’s doctrine of predestination and disagreed with the Wesley brothers’ Arminian views on the doctrine of the atonement. As a result, Whitefield did what his friends hoped he would not do—hand over the entire ministry to John Wesley. Whitefield formed and was the president of the first Methodist conference, but he soon relinquished the position to concentrate on evangelical work.
  • Notes on Russia and Crimea

 

Item number: #13608

Price: $499

 

URBAN, Sylvanus [Edward Cave]

 

The Gentleman’s Magazine: and historical Chronicle volume IX

 

London: printed Edw. Cave, 1739.

 

Details:

  • Collation: Complete with all pages
    • [4], 698, [18]
    • 2 folding maps
  • Language: English
  • Binding: Hardcover; secure
  • Size: ~8.25in X 5.25in (21cm x 13.5cm)

 

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13608

Categories

Law & Government

Religion

Voyages & Exploration & Maps

Authors

URBAN, Sylvanus [Edward Cave]

Printing Date

18th Century

Language

English

Binding

Hardcover

Book Condition

Excellent

Collation

Complete